Archive for 十二月 14th, 2009

十二月 14, 2009

Baby Faced People Live Longer~~ 娃娃臉是王道!

由 Majo
剛才看到的新聞, 高興得我心裏樂開了花~~~

根據丹麥的科學家研究,看起來比實際年齡小的人,會比較長壽! 哈哈哈~~ 高興啊高興。雖然面孔不代表一切,但是至少能多一點長命的條件都是好事情。

縂的來講,這些科學家是發現了,在人體内的專門掌管細胞分裂複製的DNA内的telomeres, 也都會影響到一個人的面容。 短的telomere會讓人看起來比較老相,而娃娃臉的人通常擁有比較長的telomere.  同時,這個telomere也都和一些疾病有密切的關係。根據他們收集的387對雙胞胎的數據中顯示, 其中看起來比較年輕的那個活的都會比較長點.

當然啦,人看起來比較老成,也都和平常的生活壓力,職業,運動,還有各個方面的東西有關係。有的人那是天生好基因,那有的人是後天好努力。不過不管如何,Child at face and soul, one will never grow old~~  大家來一起Forever 18!! 

下文是轉載來自BBC News的原文, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/8411329.stm

People who look young for their age ‘live longer’

 

Leonardo Di Caprio

Fresh-faced actor Leonardo Di Caprio might expect a long life

People blessed with youthful faces are more likely to live to a ripe old age than those who look more than their years, work shows.

Danish scientists say appearance alone can predict survival, after they studied 387 pairs of twins.

The researchers asked nurses, trainee teachers and peers to guess the age of the twins from mug shots.

Those rated younger-looking tended to outlive their older-looking sibling, the British Medical Journal reports.

Survival advantage

The researchers also found a plausible biological explanation for their results.

Key pieces of DNA called telomeres, which indicate the ability of cells to replicate, are also linked to how young a person looks.

Perceived age, which is widely used by clinicians as a general indication of a patient’s health, is a robust biomarker of ageing that predicts survival among those aged over 70
The report authors

A telomere of shorter length is thought to signify faster ageing and has been linked with a number of diseases.

In the study, the people who looked younger had longer telomeres.

All of the twins were in their 70s, 80s or 90s when they were photographed.

Over a seven-year follow-up the researchers, led by Professor Kaare Christensen of the University of Southern Denmark, found that the bigger the difference in perceived age within a pair, the more likely it was that the older-looking twin died first.

The age, sex and professional background of the assessors made no difference to any of the results.

It’s probably a combination of genes plus environment over a lifetime that are important
UK expert Professor Tim Spector

Professor Christensen said it might be that people who have had a tougher life are more likely to die early – and their life is reflected in their face.

The researchers told the BMJ: "Perceived age, which is widely used by clinicians as a general indication of a patient’s health, is a robust biomarker of ageing that predicts survival among those aged over 70."

Professor Tim Spector, a UK expert who has been doing his own twin research, said: "We are also finding this in our study.

"It’s probably a combination of genes plus environment over a lifetime that are important."

He said the findings also show that people are good at assessing how well someone is and that doctors should eyeball their patients.

"If a patient looks older than their years then perhaps they should be more concerned," he said.